Michelle Ann Kratts

Posts Tagged ‘Porter’

To Honor Heroic Deeds

In Civil War, Uncategorized on January 5, 2016 at 12:27 am

By Michelle Ann Kratts

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Recently a very precious medal of solid gold, about two inches in diameter, was discovered by someone in southern Illinois.  Photographs were posted on a Civil War website and it was requested that someone give more information.  My heart raced when I saw this…not for the gold…but for the sentiment behind this artifact of Niagara Falls history.  For this beautiful Tiffany and Company medal was a remembrance of one of Niagara’s finest men, Col. Peter A. Porter.

The medal originally was struck in honor of the five men who were present at the Battle of Cold Harbor back in June of 1864.  This medal, in particular, (found in Illinois) had been presented to John Morris Duff of Hartland, New York.  He and the four others served with the 8th Heavy Artillery during the Civil War in one of the bloodiest battles ever fought on American soil.  Col. Porter, who was beloved by all of his men, for his humanity and courage, was killed and his body left behind enemy lines.  In a moment of bravery, five of his men volunteered to retrieve his body–all while under fire.  They were able to bring his body back and because of these men Col. Peter A. Porter was returned to Niagara Falls and his body respectfully laid to rest behind the gates of the Porter family plot at Oakwood Cemetery.  Another of Oakwood’s residents, LeRoy Williams, was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his involvement in this very feat.

Following the war, the very exclusive Century Club of New York City, of which Col. Porter was a member, presented these men with these special engraved medals.  Below are images of the medal struck for John Morris Duff.

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At present the monetary value of this work of art is unknown, but to those of us who know the story behind the man, Col. Peter A. Porter, and those who served beside him, this is priceless.

 

Help for a “Fugitive”– St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, June 2, 1855

In Churches, Hotels of Niagara, Niagara Falls, The African Americans of Niagara Falls, The Underground Railroad on September 9, 2015 at 7:46 pm

By Michelle Ann Kratts

Leafing through the pages of the church records from St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Niagara Falls, New York, reveals, once again, that there were people in this city ready and willing to support the abolitionist cause.  On June 2, 1855, it was recorded under the heading, “Distributions“, that among other distributions of money given to various people in need, one dollar was given to “a negro fugitive.”

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Other notations could also possibly refer to African American freedom seekers–those amounts distributed to “a mother and son going from NY to Toronto,” “to mother and son returned from Toronto,” “charity to men travelling,” “alms to a negro missionary.”  I can’t help but wonder if any of these “distributions” ended up with Harriet Tubman, herself.

It is interesting to ponder the situation at Niagara Falls during this time period.  As documenting the Underground Railroad is a difficult task–because of the fact it was operated illegally and in secret–very few actual pieces of evidence have survived.  Each tangible item is sacred to our history–such as this documentation of aid by an established institution in the city of Niagara Falls to a “negro fugitive.”

By June of 1855, the Fugitive Slave Act was well-enforced.  Assisting a fugitive slave resulted in a possible $1,000 fine (equivalent to $28,000 today) and six months jail time. Slave owners were only required to produce an affidavit to a federal marshal to capture a “fugitive slave.”  Owners often came up north in order to “kidnap” free blacks into slavery.  As slaves had no right in court, they had no hope in defending themselves.    It was because of this law that Canada became a very important settling place for fugitive slaves and free African Americans.  It was during the 1850’s that the Underground Railroad was most active.

St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, and the individuals who ran the church during this time period, can be revealed as supporters of the Underground Railroad.  The church records show that African Americans were a part of the congregation early on in Niagara Falls’ history.  They were married and buried by this church according to the church record books.  A quick perusal enlightens us to the very same individuals that keep popping up in other records as possible leaders of this network:  Peter A. and Elizabeth Porter and the Whitney family (James and Celinda Trott, Dexter and Angeline Jerauld and Solon and Frances Drake Whitney) who were also proprietors of the Cataract House hotel, which employed so many African American waiters and cooks who were fighters on the front lines of this battle for the freedom of man.  These men and women were the leaders of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in 1855 and obviously aware of where their charity money was going.

You can check out the records for St. Peter’s Episcopal Church at http://www.monroefordham.com.

Town of Porter: Official Records of Niagara County

In Niagara County Resources, Official Records of Niagara County, Porter on May 28, 2013 at 6:38 pm

Vital records are available for the town of Porter for the following years:

Birth–1891 to present
Marriage–1891 to present
Death–1891 to present

Address:
Town Hall, 3265 Creek Road, Youngstown, NY

Website:
http://www.townofporter.net/departments/town_clerk.shtml

Email:
portertownclerk@roadrunner.com

Phone:
716-745-3730 Ext 13